DECEMBER BOOK SELECTION: SAPIENS – BY YUVAL HARARI

Note the December 22nd meeting will be held at the home of Gord & Helen Drew, 408-1742 Ravenwood Drive.

This is the book selection for the December meetings of the non-fiction bookclub being held at the home of Gillie Trowbridge, 24 Cricket Place, Peterborough on the 8th & 22nd at 2pm. All are welcome to attend and enjoy the discussion of this fascinating book!

100,000 years ago, at least six human species inhabited the earth. Today there is just one. Us. Homo sapiens. How did our species succeed in the battle for dominance? Why did our foraging ancestors come together to create cities and kingdoms? How did we come to believe in gods, nations and human rights; to trust money, books and laws; and to be enslaved by bureaucracy, timetables and consumerism? And what will our world be like in the millennia to come? In Sapiens, Dr Yuval Noah Harari spans the whole of human history, from the very first humans to walk the earth to the radical – and sometimes devastating – breakthroughs of the Cognitive, Agricultural and Scientific Revolutions. Drawing on insights from biology, anthropology, palaeontology and economics, he explores how the currents of history have shaped our human societies, the animals and plants around us, and even our personalities. Have we become happier as history has unfolded? Can we ever free our behaviour from the heritage of our ancestors? And what, if anything, can we do to influence the course of the centuries to come? Bold, wide-ranging and provocative, Sapiens challenges everything we thought we knew about being human: our thoughts, our actions, our power … and our future.                                                                           sapiens-2016

NOVEMBER BOOK SELECTION: Sacred Economics – by Charles Eisentstein

This is the book selection for the November meetings of the non-fiction bookclub:

November 10th meeting being held at the home of Ed Adams, 1042 Oriole Drive, Peterborough at 2pm

November 24th meeting being held at the home of Linda Palmason, 3022 Westridge Blvd., Peterborough at 2pm

Sacred Economics traces the history of money from ancient gift economies to modern capitalism, revealing how the money system has contributed

sacred-economicsto alienation, competition, and scarcity, destroyed community, and necessitated endless growth. Today, these trends have reached their extreme—but in the wake of their collapse, we may find great opportunity to transition to a more connected, ecological, and sustainable way of being.

This book is about how the money system will have to change—and is already changing—to embody this transition. A broadly integrated synthesis of theory, policy, and practice, Sacred Economics explores avant-garde concepts of the New Economics, including negative-interest currencies, local currencies, resource-based economics, gift economies, and the restoration of the commons. Author Charles Eisenstein also considers the personal dimensions of this transition, speaking to those concerned with “right livelihood” and how to live according to their ideals in a world seemingly ruled by money. Tapping into a rich lineage of conventional and unconventional economic thought, Sacred Economics presents a vision that is original yet commonsense, radical yet gentle, and increasingly relevant as the crises of our civilization deepen

October 2016: THIS IS YOUR BRAIN ON MUSIC, by Daniel J. Levitin

brain-on-musicThis is the book selection for the October meetings of the non-fiction bookclub being held at the home of Helen Griffin, 1370 Armstrong Drive on the 13th and 27th at 2.00pm
All are welcome to attend and enjoy the discussion of this fascinating book.
Think of a song that resonates deep down in your being. Now imagine sitting down with someone who was there when the song was recorded and can tell you how that series of sounds was committed to tape, and who can also explain why that particular combination of rhythms, timbres and pitches has lodged in your memory, making your pulse race and your heart swell every time you hear it.
Remarkably, Levitin does all this and more, interrogating the basic nature of hearing and of music making (this is likely the only book whose jacket sports blurbs from both Oliver Sacks and Stevie Wonder), without losing an affectionate appreciation for the songs he’s reducing to neural impulses. Levitin is the ideal guide to this material: he enjoyed a successful career as a rock musician and studio producer before turning to cognitive neuroscience, earning a Ph.D. and becoming a top researcher into how our brains interpret music.
Though the book starts off a little dryly (the first chapter is a crash course in music theory), Levitin’s snappy prose and relaxed style quickly win one over and will leave readers thinking about the contents of their iPods in an entirely new way.

November 2015: The Art of Stillness, by Pico Iyer

Our book this month is The Art of Stillness: Adventures in Going Nowhere, by Pico Iver. It considers the unexpected adventure of staying put, and reveals a counterintuitive truth: the more ways we have to connect, the more we seem desperate to unplug.